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© Mr David Burns

IoE Number: 209062
Location: THE LAW SOCIETY, 110-113 CHANCERY LANE WC2
  WESTMINSTER, CITY OF WESTMINSTER, GREATER LONDON
Photographer: Mr David Burns
Date Photographed: 16 September 2001
Date listed: 09 January 1970
Date of last amendment: 04 January 1995
Grade II*

The Images of England website consists of images of listed buildings based on the statutory list as it was in 2001 and does not incorporate subsequent amendments to the list. For the statutory list and information on the current listed status of individual buildings please go to The National Heritage List for England.

TQ 3181 SW CITY OF WESTMINSTER CHANCERY LANE, WC2 61/6 Nos. 110 to 113 (consec.) The Law Society (including nos. 16 to 19 9.1.70 consec. Bell Yard) II* GV the address shall be amended to read "Nos. 110 to 113 (consec.) The Law Society (including nos. 17-19 Bell Yard)" and the description shall be amended to read as follows: Law Society headquarters. Original building of 1831 by Lewis Vulliamy with remarkable north-east corner extension of 1902-4 by Charles Holden when an assistant of Percy Adams. Portland stone, slate roof. The Vulliamy building with dignified, crisply executed and correct Grecian detailing. Two storeys on granite basement. Nine windows wide. Central doorway in base of Ionic pedimented portico of four unfluted columns in antis. Recessed sash windows in shallow moulded architraves, those on first floor rising from sill band and with sharply profiled cornices. Full crowning entablature carried over from portico. Cast iron area railings. Stucco, three-storey, twenty-bay rear elevations to Bell Yard, with three-bay return to Carey Street, a more confused design with ground-floor channelled and set with piers, pilasters and columns. Cornice and balustraded parpapet. Interior with wide entrance hall, double-height reading room with red marble giant columns and pilasters particularly impressive. Holden's extension forms a corner pavilion with Carey Street. Portland stone, slate roof. Cornice heights read through from Vuillamy's building, but Holden shows remarkable freedom and originality in combining neo-classical composition with Mannerist details and cubic mass. Two main storeys and high blind attic with set-back blind attic over centre. Both facades have a principal bay with lower, narrow flanking bays of three storeys and a three-bay wing along Carey Street of two storeys, set-back storey, and dormered mansard. Channelled ground-floor with central modified Diocletian window, incorporating figure sculpture by C Pibworth, and first floor with idiosyncratically designed Venetian window; markedly narrow flanking windows plainly neo-classical surmounted by oculi to ground floor, Michaelangelesque in their framing to first and second floors. The main central bays rise above their flanks to bold dentil cornice and tall attic returned to re-entrant angle above which rises topmost central blind attic storey with pilaster-piers and blocking course over plain cornice. The wing has tall narrow architraved and corniced first floor windows. Holden's interiors are in contrast revelatory of his Arts and Crafts tendency, with low staircase in tunnel-like vault with stained glass windows leading to first-floor reception room with oak and mahogany panelling and marble finishes. Wood carving by William Aumonier and moulded friezes by Conrad Dressler. The ground-floor reception rooms of similar quality. The south end of the Law Society building is within the City of London. ------------------------------------ TQ 3181 SW CITY OF WESTMINSTER CHANCERY LANE, WC2 61/6 Nos. 110 to 113 consec: The Law Society 9.1.70 (including Nos. 16 to 19 consec. Bell Yard.) G.V. II* Law Society headquarters. Original building of 1831 by L. Vulliamy with remarkable north east corner extension of 1902 by Charles Holden when in Percy Adams' office. Portland stone, slate roof. The Vulliamy building with dignified, crisply executed and correct Grecian detailing. 2 storeys on granite basement. 9 windows wide. Central doorway in base of Ionic pedimented portico of 4 unfluted columns in antis. Recessed sash windows in shallow moulded architraves, those on 1st floor rising from sill band and with sharply profiled cornices. Full crowning entablature carried over from portico. Cast iron area railings. Stucco, 3-storey 20-bay rear elevations to Bell Yard with 3-bay return to Carey Street. Confused design to Bell Yard, the ground floor channelled with piers and pilasters and columns. 3 bays set back to south end with busier Italianate detail. Architraved recessed sashes. Cornice and balustraded parapet. Opulent Graeco-Roman decoration to main rooms of Vulliamy's interior with Reading Room behind portico with red marble giant columns and pilasters. Holden's 1902 extension forms a corner pavilion with Carey Street. Portland stone, slate roof. Cornice heights read through from Vulliamy's building, but Holden, while taking his cue from Vulliamy, shows remarkable freedom and originality in combining neoclassical composition with Mannerist details and cubic mass. 2 main storeys and high blind attic with set-back blind attic over centre. Both facades have a principal bay with lower, narrow flanking bays of 3 storeys and a 3-bay wing along Carey Street of 2 storeys, set back storey, and dormered mansard. Channelled ground floor with central modified Diocletian window (figure sculpture by C. Pibworth) and 1st floor with idiosyncratically designed Venetian window; markedly narrow flanking windows plainly neoclassical surmounted by oculi to ground floor, Michaelangelesque in their framing to 1st and 2nd floors. The main central bays rise above their flanks to bold dentil cornice and tall attic returned to re-entrant angle above which rises topmost central blind attic storey with pilaster-piers and blocking course over plain cornice. The wing has tall narrow architraved and corniced 1st floor windows. Holden's interiors are in contrast revelatory of his Arts and Crafts tendency with oak and mahogany panelling and marble finishes, wood-carving by William Aumonier and moulded friezes by Conrad Dressler etc. The south end of the Law Society building is within the City of London.

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