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© Mr Alan Bradley LRPS

IoE Number: 385599
Location: AUCKLAND CASTLE ENTRANCE GATEWAY, AUCKLAND CASTLE PARK (east side)
  BISHOP AUCKLAND, WEAR VALLEY, DURHAM
Photographer: Mr Alan Bradley LRPS
Date Photographed: 31 May 2002
Date listed: 21 April 1952
Date of last amendment: 23 May 1994
Grade I

The Images of England website consists of images of listed buildings based on the statutory list as it was in 2001 and does not incorporate subsequent amendments to the list. For the statutory list and information on the current listed status of individual buildings please go to The National Heritage List for England.

BISHOP AUCKLAND NZ2130 AUCKLAND CASTLE PARK 634-1/8/81 (East side) 21/04/52 Auckland Castle entrance gateway (Formerly Listed as: MARKET PLACE Entrance Gateway to the Castle) GV I Castle gateway with gates. 1760. By Sir Thomas Robinson of Rokeby for Bishop William Trevor. Ashlar with ashlar dressings and lead roofs. Gothick style. Vehicle arch in high gate flanked by lower screen walls with pedestrian arches. Moulded pointed arch rests on impost and chamfered pilasters, flanked by triple shafts with clasping rings which end in tall octagonal spirelets with bud finials. Recessed pairs of Gothic daggers in spandrels. Narrow set back side sections have niches with ogee heads, below pierced quatrefoils. Architrave, frieze and cornice, in manner of Classical entablature, and battlemented parapet. Square clock tower set on sloping, lead-covered plinth behind parapet, has angle pilasters with ball-topped obelisk finials, and swept low pyramidal lead spire with ball finial. Clocks on east and west fronts, blind quatrefoils with cross slits on north and south. Central arch has quadripartite ribs, and pointed arched door surround and oak panelled door in south wall. Flanking lower side walls have moulded, pointed arches, and eaves string below battlements. Rear elevation similar to front. Vehicle and pedestrian gates have spear-headed alternate principals and dogbars; pedestrian arches have wrought-iron guards in arch heads. (Colvin H: A Biographical Dictionary of British Architects 1600-1840: London: 1978-: 703).

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