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© Mr Peter Sargeant

IoE Number: 388028
Location: CHURCH OF ST CHRYSOSTOM, ANSON ROAD (west side)
  MANCHESTER, MANCHESTER, GREATER MANCHESTER
Photographer: Mr Peter Sargeant
Date Photographed: 18 October 2005
Date listed: 03 October 1974
Date of last amendment: 03 October 1974
Grade II

The Images of England website consists of images of listed buildings based on the statutory list as it was in 2001 and does not incorporate subsequent amendments to the list. For the statutory list and information on the current listed status of individual buildings please go to The National Heritage List for England.

MANCHESTERSJ8595CONYNGHAM ROAD, Rusholme698-1/22/788(East side)

MANCHESTER SJ8595 CONYNGHAM ROAD, Rusholme 698-1/22/788 (East side) 03/10/74 Church of St Chrysostom II Also known as: Church of St Chrysostom OXFORD PLACE Rusholme. Church. 1874-77, by G.T.Redmayne. Coursed sandstone rubble, slate roofs with red cockscomb ridging tiles. Early English style. Nave and chancel in one, oriented north-west/south-east, with chancel at south end, east and west aisles, small tower in angle of east aisle, porch at north end of west aisle, chapel attached to west side of chancel. The north gable, forming the principal facade, has buttresses flanking a shallow gabled porch with a 2-centred arch which has deeply chamfered jambs and 5 orders of chamfer to the head, the apex of the gable carried up as a colonnetted canopy to a statue, two 2-centred arched 2-light windows with cusped lights and multifoil tracery, and a very small lancet above. The nave has buttresses breaking through the roofs of the aisles, and small lancet clerestory windows (mostly 2 per bay); the aisles have lancets in arcaded groups of 2 and 3; and the gabled porch on the west side has a 2-centred arched doorway with chamfered jambs 3 orders of chamfer, a hoodmould with run-out ends, and a small cusped niche containing a cross. The 2-bay chapel, parallel to the chancel, has stepped triple-lancets under gables breaking the eaves, and a traceried oculus in the gable. The south-east tower has a buttressed octagonal belfry stage with louvred lancets, and a short spire. Interior not inspected.

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